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Best Beaches In Hong Kong: Our Ultimate Guide On Where To Go

Shek O beach
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Day trips to the beach

Hong Kong may be famous for its epic skyline and the hustle and bustle of its city streets, but it also has beaches a plenty. For when summer hits and you can’t afford to splash out on a full on vacay, spend the day at one of these strands and you’ll feel worlds away. Some are only a bus ride away; others take a little more perseverance to get to. But we think they’re all worth checking out. Here’s our guide all of Hong Kong’s gazette beaches (and by gazette, we mean under Hong Kong government supervision) and what we like about them. So grab the tube of sunblock and slather it all over because after reading, you’ll want to take a dip and enjoy the sun!

LAMMA ISLAND

Hung Shing Yeh beach

HUNG SHING YEH BEACH

This beach has been long adored by expats and locals because of its clear blue waters and powdery white sand. It’s the place to be when you want to host a beach party and barbecue up a storm, or just to relax and have a laid-back day. Hung Shing Yeh is also fully equipped with all the essentials and has very good water quality. Lamma Island is always a sweet getaway and only a 30-minute ferry ride from Central. But fair warning, it’s best avoided during weekends and public holidays because this beach gets overrun! While you’re in Lamma, do some exploring and check out the 360 Ngo Ride or the Buddha statue.

Facilities: changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits and public toilets, lifeguards
How to get there: Take the ferry from Central pier 4 to Yung Shue Wan and take the Family Walk. Hung Shing Yeh Beach is a 30-minute walk from the hill top pavilion.

LO SO SHING BEACH

Some people would argue that Lo So Shing Beach is one of the most beautiful stretches of sand on Lamma Island! It’s a small little crescent shaped beach that is adorned on the edges by thick, forested hills. Because it does take some effort to get there,, it’s almost always deserted and lovely.

Facilities: changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits and public toilets
How to get there: Take the ferry from Central pier 4 to Yung Shue Wan and take the Family Walk. Lo So Shing Beach is a 15-minute walk from the hill top pavilion. 

CHEUNG CHAU

Kwun Yam Wan beach

KWUN YAM BEACH

This beach is loved by surfers but is also perfect for little children! Your kids can pay a visit to the Shan Shan sculpture, Hong Kong’s Olympic champion. Adults, teenagers, and children will love its charm, with all of its fresh seafood and the beautiful beach so pack up and head on out to the ferry!

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits and public toilets
How to get there: From the Central Ferry Pier, board #5 boat to Cheung Chau

TUNG WAN BEACH

If Cheung Chau beaches are good enough for an Olympic windsurfing champion, Lee Lai-Shan, to train, you know they’re good enough for us! You can easily make a day trip here and visit the entire island. If you’re into watersports, the Chung Chau Windsurfing Centre also provides windsurfing, surfing, and canoeing equipment, so gear up and take your little adventure buddy to see some unusual coastal rock formations and Mini Great Walls form from the waters around here. A day trip to Cheung Chau is always rewarding, and the escape from Hong Kong is just a ferry ride away.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits and public toilets
How to get there: Central Ferry Pier, board #5 boat to Cheung Chau

Read more: Cheung Chau: Sassy Mama’s Neighbourhood Guide To One Of Our Favourite Islands

LANTAU ISLAND

Silvermine Bay Beach

SILVER MINE BAY BEACH

Just a short walk from Mui Wo ferry pier, Silvermine Bay beach itself is considered one of the cleanest in Hong Kong. Though relatively quiet during the day, Silvermine comes alive at night, with many enjoying the public barbecue pits and other dining options available nearby. 

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits and public toilets
How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo and when there, turn right and go to Mui WO Ferry Pier Road, walk to Ngan Kwong Wan Road and along Ngan She Street, soon, you will be at Tung Wan Tau Road and the beach.

Editor’s note: Due to beach improvement works, all beach facilities and lifeguard services will be suspended until mid 2018.

PUI O BEACH

Pui O Beach has a very relaxed, laid back vibe, and although it is popular, it never feels overwhelmingly busy. Complete with a campsite, Pui O is a great spot for a night under the stars – just be wary of the water buffalo that can stray away from the nearby fields for a sleep on the beach! It’s also worth noting that, although pleasant, the sand here is darker and quite sticky – so don’t visit and expect to find idyllic white sands. Beyond the gorgeous backdrop and mini holiday feel that comes with Lantau’s beaches, another reason to hit up Pui O is Ooh La La, an alfresco restaurant with tasty smoothies and burgers for the kids – and jugs of sangria for you! Just be sure to book a table in advance to avoid disappointment. Its beachside location means water-obsessed kids can head back out to play while you linger a bit longer – which is what you’ll want to do. (If you want to make this a real staycation, you can camp the night at Ooh La La which supplies all the gear you need).

Facilities: Restaurant, changing rooms, showers, campsites, barbecue pits and public toilets.
How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo, board bus 1 to Pui O Beach (15 minutes) or take the MTR to Tung Chung and then the 3M bus, board the 3M bus (20 minutes), cross the road and walk down the path that leads to the sea.
Alternatively, take the MTR to Tung Chung and then take the 3M bus, which should take about 20 minutes. Cross the road and walk down the path that leads to the sea.

UPPER AND LOWER CHEUNG SHA BEACH

Located on southern Lantau, Cheung Sha Wan is one of Hong Kong’s longest beaches. Stretching around 3km, you’ll find two beaches here: Lower Cheung Sha and Upper Cheung Sha. Graced with sand that is lighter and finer than at Pui O, the beach is perfect for big kids to build sandcastles, or for sun-lovers to spend an afternoon tanning. Lower Cheung Sha has more restaurants and tends to be busier, so if you want to escape the crowds, head to Upper Cheng Sha beach. Kids will love the ferry ride (hop on Central Pier 6 for Mui Wo)! The beaches here are well equipped with the usual suspects: picnic tables, showers, changing rooms, etc. You’ll love that Cheung Sha Village has lots of great chilled out beachside restaurants and cafes. The Stoep is especially family-friendly.

Facilities: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, barbecue pits and public toilets
How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo, then take 1, 2, or 4 bus o Lower Cheung She Village and then a 5 minute walk to either beaches, Alternatively, take the MTR to Tung Chung, then board the 11 or 23 bus, which should take about 20 minutes to Lower Cheung Sha Village (a 5-minute walk from either beaches).

TONG FUK BEACH

Tong Fuk Beach sits on a village and is a popular place for holiday recreation when families rent out village houses! This has a stretch of fine sand and sea edged by rocks, and the village’s rustic charm is enough to bring people to Tong Fuk. This beach is ringed by peaks and swimming here is just fabulous!

Facilities: refreshment kiosks, barbecue pits, changing rooms, campsite shower facilities
How to get there: Take the ferry from Central Pier 6 to Mui Wo, take buses 1, 2, 4, or A35 along South Lantau Road.

SAI KUNG

Clearwater Bay

CLEAR WATER BAY, FIRST AND SECOND BEACH

Sitting in the southeast corner of the New Territories, Clearwater Bay comprises two beaches. Aptly named Clearwater Bay First Beach and Clearwater Bay Second Beach, the two are separated by a short stretch of rocky coast, and both are popular. First beach is a little more secluded and can be quieter, though only Second Beach has a small café selling refreshments. Our fave, though, is Second Beach, which is a bit more scenic and offers more of the perks that families need (Note: you need to take stairs to get the beach so you’ll need to ditch the stroller).

Facilities: Café, changing rooms, showers, changing rooms, barbecue pits, umbrellas, public toilets
How to get there: At Diamond Hill Station, board bus 91 which stops at at Clearwater Bay First Beach and then Clearwater Bay Second Beach. These beaches are connected so if you want to visit both, just take the footpath and steps.

SILVERSTRAND BEACH

Silverstrand Beach is ideal for swimming and is one of the more preferred spots for its scenic landscape. A wide variety of amenities are available as well. If you have a car, there is parking available.

Facilities: Car parking, refreshment kiosks, barbecue pits, changing rooms and shower facilities
How to get there: Bus 91 passes Silverstrand Beach north of Hang Hau before reaching Tai Au Mun; if you wish, you can get off at Silverstrand and go for a dip. If you’re heading for Lung Ha Wan, get off the bus at Tai Au Mun village and start walking. From Sai Kung, take bus 92 to where Hiram’s Hwy and Clearwater Bay Rd meet and change there to bus 91.

TRIO BEACH

Grab your kids and head down to this treasure trove because it’s easy to reach with little ones in tow. Trio Beach has all the essential amenities and your little kids can paddle away in the shallow water under your watchful eyes. Grab a book and lie down in the luscious white sand as the kids make sand castles. Rent an umbrella for nap time! This beach is probably Hong Kong’s most environmentally friendly and clean beach. Though it’s the most convenient beach in Sai Kung, Trio is still secludedok, it’s remote. We admit it is a trek to get to, but hey, it involves a sampan ride! And once you get there, the combination of calm water and soft sand – not to mention mellow beachy dining options, BBQ pits, and the standard public beach amenities – make this a great day trip with the kids. Bonus: it’s also a beach that consistently is at the top of the Environmental Protection Department’s rankings of water quality.

Facilities: refreshment kiosks, barbecue pits, changing rooms, campsite shower facilities
How to get there: Board 1A minibus fro Choi Hung MTR or 101M minibus from Hang Hau MTR, alternatively, take the sampan (sampans leave regularly and should only cost $20 per person but prices may vary because a sampan is one man and his boat, so beware and negotiate) and stop at Oak She Wan.

Read more: Sai Kung: The Ultimate Neighbourhood Guide For Families In Hong Kong

KIU TSUI BEACH

The larger of the two beaches on Sharp Island, this one has a tombolo that connects to the islet called Kiu Tau, so when tides are low, you can venture out and walk on the tombolo. Your kid will feel like Moana on her own tiny islet. “See the line where the sky meets the ocean? It calls me!” Another perk of going to Sharp Island is that you can hike from Kiu Tsui Beach all the way to Half Moon Bay and vice versa. It is only 1.6 kilometres so you can pay both beaches a visit. The views are also totally worth it!

Facilities: refreshment kiosks, barbecue pits, changing rooms, campsite shower facilities
How to get there: Board the Sai Kung ferry/kaito to Sharp Island Kiu Tsui Beach. The schedule varies but most leave at intervals of 30 minutes. Should cost $40 per person.

HALF MOON BAY/ HAP MUN BAY BEACH

Nothing beats a dip after a hike, and Hap Mun Bay is the perfect spot for this. Part of the Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark, it’s home to many unique and curious rock formations that go all the way back 140 million years. This place is decked out with all the essential amenities and also allows you to hike around the island’s Kiu Tsui Country Park, where you can admire unique fauna and flora. Be careful of the sharp rocks!

Facilities: refreshment kiosks, barbecue pits, changing rooms, campsite shower facilities
How to get there: Board the Sai Kung ferry/kaito to Sharp Island Half-Moon Bay Public Pier. The schedule varies but most leave at intervals of 30 minutes. Should cost $40 per person.

SOUTHERN

Repulse Bay

REPULSE BAY BEACH

Repulse is a popular choice for weekend beach goers. It’s bigger than Stanley, but it still gets pretty crowded, and is one of Hong Kong’s most accessible beaches. But it’s got everything you need – and vendors with things you forgot (umbrellas, sand toys). Take a break from the beach at the playground and be sure to toss a coin into the mouth of the fish statue for good luck at the Tin Hau Temple before you head home. If you’re not into the snack shack thing, head to the Repulse Bay shopping area. It has a supermarket as well as great restaurants like the Verandah and Spices (both of which need reservations). Arrive early for a good space on the sand, spend your day catching some rays, and be sure to stop for lunch along the boardwalk. Our personal favourite eateries in Repulse include Amalfitana Pizza, Limewood and Classified (not to mention, they’re all family-friendly!).

Features: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers and public toilets.
How to get there: Follow the same route as the one to Stanley, but alight at Repulse Bay Beach bus stop. Once off the bus, simply cross the road and make your way down the steps to the sand!

DEEP WATER BAY BEACH

The (somewhat) quieter little sister to Repulse Bay, Deep Water Bay is also located just up the hill from two of the busiest beaches on HK Island. Popular with locals and early morning swimmers, and with more than 30 barbecue pits, it’s always a popular spot. It is stocked with lifeguards for such a small beach. There is a small café and a nice cold beer is great on a hot summer day! Cheers to that!

Facilities: Café, changing rooms, showers, public toilets and barbecue pits
How to get there: Follow the same route as the one to Stanley, but alight at Deep Water Bay bus stop.

BIG WAVE BAY

Big Wave Bay is not called Big Wave Bay without reason because this beach is Hong Kong’s only officially recognized surf beach due to its waves and consistent swell (did it’s name not give that away?). It’s a hit with surfers and you’ll find everything from chair and sun umbrella rentals and lifeguards. It also has board and rowing boat rentals and lessons if the young ones want to hang ten or boogie board. If your kids are ready to hike, take the route from Dragon’s Back for a good four hours of exploring Hong Kong’s nature. There are a good handful of bars and restaurants for light refreshments or meals. Surfer or not, it’s a clean and scenic beach with hills all around.

Feature: Cafés, changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits.
How to get there: Take the MTR to Shau Kei Wan, (exit A3) and take bus 9, or a taxi, to Shek O. Bus ride to Shek O bus terminus is about 30 minutes. Get off at the junction of Shek O Road with Big Wave Bay Road (at a sharp U-turn) and walk about 10 minutes to Big Wave Bay Village and beach.

CHUNG HOM KOK BEACH

Tucked away around the corner from Stanley sits Chung Hom Kok, a quaint beach that has ‘urban hideaway’ written all over it. Easily accessible but slightly tricky to find if you’ve never ventured there before, Chung Hom Kok is a short 3-minute walk down a leafy park directly off a quiet residential street (meaning it’s nowhere near as busy as the likes of Repulse Bay or Stanley). With a stack of BBQ pits, full-time lifeguard service and nice water for swimming, it’s an ideal spot to catch up with family or friends for a day at the beach.

Features: Café, changing rooms, showers, public toilets, barbecue pits.
How to get there: From Central Exchange Square (near Hong Kong Station MTR, Exit D), take bus 6X, 63, 66, or 973 to Chung Hom Kok Beach, on Chung Hom Kok Road.

MIDDLE BAY BEACH

Middle Bay Beach is a quiet beach located between Repulse Bay and South Bay. If you haven’t been, you are missing out because this little inlet is pretty special. We hesitate to even write about this one because being quiet and never crowded is part of its charm! The beach area is actually quite small, so you can easily read book while keeping your kids in sight as children play. Be sure to visit The Bauhinia because it serves yummy breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and a variety of drinks, too.

Features: Changing rooms, shower area, lifeguards and shark nets, barbecue area, beach umbrella rental, open air restaurants, barbecue area.
How to get there: At Central Exchange Square, board the bus 6, 6A, 66, or 260 to Repulse Bay, then take the taxi or walk to Middle Beach.

Shek O Beach

SHEK O BEACH

A popular beach – and rightfully so! – to cool off at after hiking Dragon’s back, Shek O is ever popular with locals and tourists alike. Go prepared and enjoy a seaside barbecue at one of the many pits available. It’s best to arrive as early as possible, as the barbecues are available only on a first-come-first-serve basis, and they fill up quickly! Lots of people consider this their favourite beach on the island. It has a scenic view of the small island Ng Fan Chau Island Bay. The village has a mellow vibe so it’s great for a stroll. The many beachside cafés are delicious, and we think Thai-Chinese on rotary is seriously YUM!

Features: Café, changing rooms, showers, public toilets and barbecue pits.
How to get there: Take the MTR to Shau Kei Wan (exit A3) and hop on bus 9, or take a taxi to Shek O. It should take about 30 minutes to reach Shek O bus terminus.

SHEK O BACK BEACH

A 5-minute walk from the main Shek O Beach – Shek O Back Beach is a dog-friendly paradise. Another draw is that it tends to be a little quieter, as it’s a little hidden, and crowds are normally drawn to Shek O main beach. Be sure to head to Ben’s Back Beach Bar and cool off with one of its signature (and cheap!) cocktails.

Features: Café, changing rooms, showers, public toilets and barbecue pits.
How to get there: Follow the directions to Shek O beach and get off at the Shek O Bus Terminus. Head towards the colourful houses when entering Shek O Village, and the paved road will lead you to the Shek O Back Beach.

Ben’s Back Beach Bar, 273 Shek O Village, Shek O, Hong Kong, 2809 2268

Read more: Where To Go With Your Pet: The Best Dog-Friendly Restaurants, Beaches, Hikes and Parks In Hong Kong 

SOUTH BAY BEACH

One of Hong Kong’s less frequented beaches – it has its own beach club where you can dance away to a DJ spinning all afternoon! Also be sure to check out the club’s restaurant where you can eat al-fresco. Unlike the much more accessible Repulse Bay, the effort to get to South Bay Beach is truly worth it. If you’re lucky, you’ll get a glimpse of a stunning sunset so grab a cab and dance away at South Bay Beach!

Features: Changing rooms, shower area, lifeguards and shark nets, Barbecue area, beach umbrella rental, open air restaurants, barbecue area.
How to get there: Bus 6, 6A, 6X, 66 or 260 from Exchange Square Bus Terminus to Repulse Bay, then take a taxi to South Bay (a 10-minute ride), or walk (a 30-minute walk).

 STEPHEN’S BEACH

This secluded beach is right next to Stanley Main Beach but much quieter and quainter. It is a 15-minute walk from Stanley Main Beach and it feels like an entirely different world. It is far less crowded than all the other beaches near Stanley, however it is also much smaller. It is a bit off the beaten path, off Wong Ma Kok Road, so there are not a lot of visitors. Best of all, it’s shaded!

Features: Changing rooms, showers, public toilets and barbecue pits.
How to get there: At Central Exchange Square or Connaught Road outside of City Hall and Queensway Admiralty MTR Station, take the bus 6, 6A, 6X, 260 and stop at Stanley Village bus stop. Follow the Stanley Beach Road for about 200 meters to find Wong Ma Kok Road and follow it down to St. Stephen’s Beach.

Stanley Beach

STANLEY MAIN BEACH

Famous for its market, Stanley is always full of activity. Great for taking visiting guests to, and also good for picking up some souvenirs before chilling out on the sand. We have to warn you that this beach gets very busy, so it’s not one to go to if you’re looking to avoid the crowds. Stanley Main Beach is also great to cool down at after completing The Twins hike. Enjoy a quick swim (or drink…), before heading home, and those 1,000 steps will be well earned!

Be sure to wander along the boardwalk and choose from the many seafront restos, or pick up some groceries from the supermarket in Stanley Plaza and have your own beach side BBQ. It’s also home to the annual Dragon Boat races, so keep your eye out for team’s practices during the season.

Features: Restaurants, changing rooms, showers, public toilets and barbecue pits.
How to get there: From Central Exchange Square (near Hong Kong Station MTR, Exit D), take bus 6, 6A, 6X, 260, and alight at Stanley Village bus stop, which should take about 50 minutes. You can also hop on the same buses from Connaught Road outside City Hall and Queensway at Admiralty MTR Station. To reach the beach, follow Stanley Beach Road for about 200 metres from the bus stop. You could also take a taxi from Central, but as there is only one road into Stanley, it’s not likely to be much quicker, and will be more expensive.

TURTLE COVE BEACH

Turtle Cove Beach is a tiny and cute beach tucked away out past the Tai Tam Reservoir. It has calm waters, facilities, and a kiddie playground, which makes it a great family spot. The only downside is the set of 200 stairs that lead from the road to the beach, so pack lightly! It’s quaintly nestled in lush green forestry and is a real escape because there are no stalls for drinks for food nearby. Be sure to pack a picnic and stay for a couple of hours. If you’ve got an animal lover in your brood, bring them here to see the turtle-nesting place. This is the last known nesting place for Hong Kong’s endangered sea turtles.

Features: Barbecue area, playground, showers, changing rooms, toilets.
How to get there: At Sai Wan Ho MTR, board Bus 14 and get off right after the Tai Tam Reservoir then take the steep steps down to Turtle Cove Beach.

TSEUN WAN

Lido Beach

LIDO BEACH

Let’s get active! Play some beach volleyball here or go for a quick swim. This beach may be small but it’s fully equipped for such a small beach, especially with two beach volleyball courts. You can view the magnificent architecture of the bridge. Sit and sunbathe (remember sunscreen though!) and watch other people play beach volleyball, if you don’t yourself. There are also trees here for some much-needed shade in the summer. 

Features: Beach volleyball courts, changing rooms, showers, toilets, tuck shop.
How to get there: At Tai Wo Hau Station, board bus 302 towards Hong Kong Gardens and walk to Lido Beach.

ANGLER’S BEACH

A stretch of golden sand perfect for your lil’ tots’ feet to run in. Perhaps one of the most scenic beaches Hong Kong has to offer with clear emerald waters, the trio of bridges, and green mounds of islands. The view here is spectacular! There are 11 barbecue pits here. This place is wildly popular for family picnics and barbecues and it should remain that way, so come! Again, I recommend not swimming because of pollution and contamination from sewers in the past.

Features: Changing rooms, showers, lifeguards, toilets, barbeque area
How to get there: Take the 52X bus from Mongkok or 962B bus from Central to Sham Tseng. The beach is less than a 5-minute walk from the centre of town.

GEMINI BEACH

Beautiful! A gem! Superb sunsets! This place is quiet, almost devoid of people, which makes it perfect! It is not a very popular beach but should be because of its great views. The barbecue area is great for cookin’ up some food, and feels like a private beach. Swimming has been prohibited before, but now that it isn’t please exercise caution!

Features: Changing rooms, showers, lifeguards, toilets, barbecue area.
How to get there: At Tai Wo Hau Station, board bus 302 towards Hong Kong Gardens, walk past Hot Mei Wan Beach to Gemini Beach.

HOI MEI WAN BEACH

Most of the beaches in Tseun Wan are usually ideal for sunbathing but not for swimming. The little staircase that walks you down to this beach is pretty amazing. Historically, water pollution here was pretty bad, but since about decade ago, the Hong Kong government has been working very hard on improving the water quality. It is definitely better. You’re allowed to swim, though! Hoi Mei Wan Beach is scenic and quiet because of those reasons.

Features: Changing rooms, showers, lifeguards, toilets.
How to get there: At Tai Wo Hau Station, board bus 302 towards Hong Kong Gardens, walk to Hoi Mei Wan Beach.

CASAM BEACH

A quiet getaway! Right above is the massive Ting Kau bridge, so sit back and enjoy the view as boats pass by the harbor. This is a family-friendly beach for a day trip out, but even more special for a romantic night out with your love. This is a site worth seeing and the perfect lookout spot. It’s considered the little sister to Lido Beach. Casam Beach is only a few minutes to the west and is much smaller. It does not have the long sweep of sand but it makes up for it with its charm. Go there if you want to avoid the Lido Beach crowd! Best during winter months when there is the least amount of pollution and is the cleanest.

Features: Beach volleyball courts, changing rooms, showers, toilets, tuck shop.
How to get there: At Tai Wo Hau Station, board bus 302 towards Hong Kong Gardens, walk to Lido Beach and walk west of Lido Beach to Casam Beach. 

Ting Kau village

TING KAU BEACH

Love a good sunset? Ting Kau is an excellent place to for just that. Many visitors say Lido Beach has far better water quality (so swim there instead) but this is the place to be if want a nice beach stroll and scenic view.You can even rent a boat! Ting Kau Village is only a 3-minute walk away, sits right underneath the Ting Kau Bridge and looks out to Tsing Yi Island. It’s tiny and most of the visitors to Ting Kau Beach are locals.

Features: Easily accessible, toilets, changing rooms, showers, lifeguards, playground.
How to get there: Board bus 234b from Tseun Wan West MTR Station.

APPROACH BEACH

Come here for a walk,a hike or a swim! Pack yourself a picnic, or pack barbecue prep and head right on out. Approach Beach is not often frequented, so you’ll probably find yourself having a peaceful day out with your kids. There is a barbecue area and toilets, showers, changing rooms, and lifeguards.

Facilities: Barbeque area, toilets, changing rooms, showers, lifeguards.
How to get there: At Tai Wo Hau Station, board bus 302 towards Hong Kong Gardens and walk to Approach Beach.

MA WAN TUNG WAN BEACH

Looking for some peace? Located on Ma Wan Island, Ma Wa Tung Wan is quiet and one of the least crowded swimming beaches. It is clean and scenic with beautiful, soft, white sand that you can sink your feet into. You will love the picturesque view of the iconic Hong Kong bridges including the Tsing Ma Beach and the Kap Shui Mun Bridge. This beach is popular for wedding pictures (or Insta-stories!) so snap away with the camera! There are plenty of beach restaurants that typically cost $50 for lunch with a wide variety including Thai food, Japanese food, and Western food. Visit the Ma Wan Park nearby and make a trip to Noah’s Ark Theme Park, which is a fun trip on its own.

Features: Restaurants, showers, changing rooms, toilets, Noah’s Ark Theme Park, Ma Wan park
How to get there: By Ferry: Ferry service from Central Pier 2 on Hong Kong Island to Park Island Pier and walk to Ma Wan Park to beach, By Bus: Take the Ark Express Bus from MOKO (formerly known as the Grand Century Place) in Mongkok (adjacent to Mong Kok East MTR station) to Noah’s Ark and walk to beach, Other buses 

TUEN MUN

Kadoorie Beach

KADOORIE BEACH

This gem of a beach is truly the littlest of the beaches that run along the Tuen Mun shoreline, but it’s nonetheless an incredibly attractive little beach. It a 10-minute walk west to Cafeteria Old Beach. A setback is that Kadoorie Beach is a little difficult to find but the benefit is that it is the least visited beach in the Tuen Mun shoreline collection of beaches. This beach does have its regulars who frequent and claim this beach to be their favourite, especially morning swimmers.

Features: Entire length of Tuen Mun beach amenities, barbecue area, changing rooms, showers, toilets, lifeguard service
How to get there: By Bus: Tuen Mun MTR Station: Bus K51 or K53 (during peak hours) at exit C2. Get off at Golden Beach Station and walk down the strip of beach past Golden Beach, Cafeteria New Beach, and Cafeteria Old Beach, or Hong Kong Macau Ferry Terminal: Bus 962B or 962 (during peak hours) from Wing On Centre Station and get off at Golden Beach Station and walk down the strip of beach past Golden Beach, Cafeteria New Beach, and Cafeteria Old Beach.

BUTTERFLY BEACH

There is a campsite here! If you’ve got lil’ campers who are ready for some nature exploring, bring them to Butterfly Beach for the weekend and stay at the Butterfly Beach Park Camping Site. It has a magnificent, magical view and is easily accessible. There are loads of facilities at the campgrounds, as well including a barbecue area (you are not allowed to light a fire here), jogging track, soccer pitch, volleyball court, basketball court, toilets, and refreshment kiosks. The beach here is a popular as there are no big waves and you can fish as well. The sand is spectacularly soft and it offers a romantic view.

Features: Refreshment kiosks, barbecue area, changing rooms, showers, toilets, Tuen Mun Butterfly Beach Park Camping Site along with the Park itself.
How to get there: Take the light rail (615P, 615, 610, 614P, 507) or bus to Tuen Mun Ferry Pier and walk along the Tuen Mun promenade.

CASTLE PEAK BEACH

One of the five beaches that sit on the Tuen Mun shoreline, it is staffed by lifeguards in summer. Historically, this beach was very attractive to swimmers but was later damaged by a typhoon, which resulted in a loss of sand and trees, and since the 20 years of rebuilding and improving this beach, Castle Peak Beach is ready for its former glory. Walking distance from Golden Beach. Walk a little further and you’ll be at Castle Peak Beach Seafood Street, also known as Sham Shing Hui, to satisfy all of your seafood cravings. This place gets busy during the weekends and nights and you’ll experience a more local vibe rather than a touristy vibe. You can pick out and buy your fresh seafood and bring it to one of the many restaurants. Just choose the ‘cooking method’ for the seafood, accompanying ingredients, and ta-dah! So much fun selecting from the market as well. Do this after a good swim and shower if you’re staying for dinner or come before you take a swim!

Features: Castle Peak Beach Seafood Street, barbecue area, changing rooms, showers, toilets.
How to get there: By Bus: Tuen Mun MTR Station: Bus K51 or K53 (during peak hours) at exit C2 and get off at Golden Beach Station and walk down the strip of beach past Golden Beach and Cafeteria New Beach, and Cafeteria Old Beach, or Hong Kong Macau Ferry Terminal: Bus 962B or 962 (during peak hours) from Wing On Centre Station. Get off at Golden Beach Station and walk down the strip of beach past Golden Beach, Cafeteria New Beach, and Cafeteria Old Beach.

Cafeteria Old Beach 

CAFETERIA OLD BEACH

Another one of the beaches that run on the strip in Tuen Mun, thisis much quieter than the popular Golden Beach and the water and sand are cleaner than that of Cafeteria New Beach and Golden Beach. Located on 18 ¾ milestone, Castle Peak Road, the sea view andquivering coastline make it a perfect place to watch the sunset. What makes this different in comparison to Cafeteria New Beach and Golden Beach is that the barbecue facilities are much better maintained and convenient, with clean wooden table next to the grills. The sand is incredibly soft as well.

Features: Entire length of Tuen Mun beach amenities, refreshment kiosks, barbecue area, changing rooms, showers, lifeguard service.
How to get there: By Bus: Tuen Mun MTR Station: Bus K51 or K53 (I) at exit C2 and get off at Golden Beach Station.Walk down the strip of beach past Golden Beach and Cafeteria New Beach, or Hong Kong Macau Ferry Terminal: Bus 962B or 962 (during peak hours) from Wing On Centre Station.Get off at Golden Beach Station and walk down the strip of beach past Golden Beach and Cafeteria New Beach.

CAFETERIA NEW BEACH

This beach is contiguously adjacent to Golden Beach, and while Golden Beach may be the biggest, this one has an awesome volleyball court (that is almost always simultaneously referred to as the Golden Beach volleyball court but actually sits in Cafeteria New Beach). Be sure to come here and watch the Hong Kong Beach Volleyball Team play if you won’t be playing yourself!

Features: Volleyball court, walking distance from Golden Beach amenities, limited lifeguard service suspended during November to March, refreshment kiosks, barbecue area, changing rooms, showers.
How to get there: By Bus: Tuen Mun MTR Station: Bus K51 or K53 (during peak hours) at exit C2 and get off at Golden Beach Station, or Hong Kong Macau Ferry Terminal: Bus 962B or 962 (during peak hours) from Wing On Centre Station.Get off at Golden Beach Station.

GOLDEN BEACH

If you are looking into getting away from the bustling city life for a day or two, board the bus and head to Golden Beach for beautiful sunsets and plane watching on a man-made beach paradise. This is a gem features lots of crabs, shells, and smooth rocks that get washed up in the mornings. Your kids will love running around on the pristine sand! The gentle baby surf is soothing. If you book yourself into the Gold Coast Hotel, be sure to come to Golden Beach for a morning swim or go for a walk in the nearby park. Visit the many eateries nearby and walk to the Gold Coast Piazza. Best avoid peak hours because it does get busy (and in busy, I mean really busy).

Features: volleyball court, refreshment kiosks, hotel, shopping mall, changing rooms, showers, Dolphin Square, seaside promenade, toilets, tuck shops, year-round lifeguard service.
How to get there: By Taxi: Approximately 30 minutes, $250/trip *tunnel fee charged separately By Bus: Tuen Mun MTR Station: Bus K51 or K53 (during peak hours) at exit C2 and get off at Golden Beach Station, or Hong Kong Macau Ferry Terminal: Bus 962B or 962 (during peak hours) from Wing On Centre Station.Get off at Golden Beach Station.

Feature image courtesy of Getty Images; image 1 courtesy of Prosperity Horizons  via Commons Wikimedia; image 2 courtesy of Mk2010 via Commons Wikimedia; image 3 courtesy of File Upload Bot (Magnus Manske) via Commons Wikimedia; image 4 courtesy of Prosperity Horizons and Wpcpey via Commons Wiki Media; image 5 courtesy of Earth100 via Commons Wikimedia; image 6 courtesy of Leo Gonzales via Flickr; image 7 Feature image courtesy of Wpcpey via Commons Wikimedia; image 8 courtesy of Enochlau via Commons Wikimedia; image 9 courtesy of 圍棋一級 via Commons Wikimedia; image 10 courtesy of 圍棋一級 via Commons Wikimedia; image 11 courtesy of Minghong via Commons Wikimedia; image 12 courtesy of Wpcpey via Commons Wikimedia;

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